Pope Francis stands condemned by Catholic Tradition for promoting unnatural impurity


Q:        What should I say when people tell me that the Catholic Church now accepts unnatural “lifestyles” because the pope does not condemn them and he says “Who am I to judge?”

A:      Although Pope Francis is our pope, he is a bad pope.  He is our father, but is a bad father.  He is reconciling himself with modern licentious, unnatural, and debauched views.  It is true that he scandalized the world with his refusing to condemn “lifestyles” of unnatural impurity, saying: “who am I to judge?”.  But this is merely the tip of the iceberg.  He has a long history of supporting and fostering the unnatural lifestyle itself.  For example, he suggested that those engaging in the unnatural vice as a pair should be given legal status and rights: “‘What we have to create is a civil union law.  That way they are legally covered,’ Francis said in the documentary, ‘Francesco,”[1]   He has issued many other such scandalous statements.[2]

But Sacred Scripture condemns the unnatural vice in over twenty places.  Here are just a few:

·         “For this cause God delivered them up to shameful affections. For their women have changed the natural use into that use which is against nature.  And, in like manner, the men also, leaving the natural use of the women, have burned in their lusts one towards another, men with men working that which is filthy, and receiving in themselves the recompense which was due to their error.”  Romans, 1:26-27.

·         “Do not err: neither fornicators, nor idolaters, nor adulterers, nor the effeminate … shall possess the kingdom of God.”   1 Corinthians, 6:9-10

·         Genesis narrates the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrha and the cities around these, and shows clearly that it was in punishment for the unnatural vice, which God says is “very grave”.  Genesis 18:20-21, 19:1-15.

Catholic catechisms take note of such exceptionally strong condemnations of certain sins in Scripture, including this one, and label these as the sins “crying to heaven for vengeance”.

Besides Sacred Scripture, however, countless writings from early Church Fathers, popes, saints, and Church Doctors are in unanimous agreement in condemning this vice.  The quotes would be too numerous to list, but they share the strength of quotes like these:

·         “No sin in the world grips the soul as the accursed sodomy; this sin has always been detested by all those who live according to God ….  Deviant passion is close to madness; this vice disturbs the intellect, destroys elevation and generosity of soul, brings the mind down from great thoughts to the lowliest ….  They become blind and, when their thoughts should soar to high and great things, they are broken down and reduced to vile and useless and putrid things, which could never make them happy ….  Just as people participate in the glory of God in different degrees, so also in hell some suffer more than others ….  for this is the greatest sin.  St. Bernardine of Siena, Sermon XXXIX in Prediche volgari, pp. 896-897, 915.

·         "If all the sins of the flesh are worthy of condemnation because by them man allows himself to be dominated by that which he has of the animal nature, much more deserving of condemnation are the sins against nature by which man degrades his own animal nature….”  St. Thomas Aquinas, Super Epistolam B. Pauli ad Romanos, Cap. 1, Lec. 8.

Pope Francis appears to think all the above “was then, but this is now”.  But truth does not change, and he is condemned by the infallible condemnation in Pope Pius IX’s Syllabus of Errors:

Condemned statement #80:

The Roman Pontiff can, and ought to, reconcile himself, and come to terms with progress, liberalism and modern civilization.

Pope Francis appears to consider the above-quoted condemnations to be changeable and “subject to progress”, but this is condemned by Pope Pius IX’s Syllabus of Errors:

Condemned statement #5:

Divine revelation is imperfect, and therefore subject to a continual and indefinite progress, corresponding with the advancement of human reason.



[2]           For example:

·         Pope Francis told a man who openly lived an unnaturally impure “lifestyle” in Chile, “You know Juan Carlos, that does not matter.  God made you like this.  God loves you like this. The Pope loves you like this and you should love yourself and not worry about what people say.”    https://www.cnn.com/2018/05/21/europe/pope-francis-gay-comments-intl/index.html

·         Through an interpreter, he told another man who openly lived an unnaturally impure “lifestyle”, “Giving more importance to the adjective rather than the noun, this is not good.  We are all human beings and have dignity.  It does not matter who you are or how you live your life, you do not lose your dignity.  There are people that prefer to select or discard people because of the adjective – these people don’t have a human heart.”  https://cruxnow.com/church-in-uk-and-ireland/2019/04/pope-francis-tells-gay-man-you-do-not-lose-your-dignity-on-bbc-show/   

 

The pope’s claim that one cannot lose his dignity no matter what a person does, is a conciliar error in direct opposition to Traditional Catholic teaching – which states that man retains his dignity only by obeying God’s laws and the natural law, but loses his dignity through sin. 

 

St. Thomas Aquinas lucidly explains how man loses his dignity through sin:

By sinning, man departs from the order of reason, and consequently falls away from the dignity of his manhood, insofar as he is naturally free, and exists for himself, and he falls into the slavish state of the beasts ….  Hence, although it is evil in itself to kill a man so long as he preserves his dignity, yet it may be good to kill a man who has sinned, even as it is to kill a beast.  For a bad man is worse than a beast, and is more harmful, as the Philosopher states (Polit. i, 1 and Ethic. vii, 6).

 

Summa, IIa IIae, Q.64, a.2, ad 3 (emphasis added).

 

For a further treatment of this Catholic principle, read the explanation in Lumen Gentium Annotated, by the editors of Quanta Cura Press, © 2013, p.73, footnote 48.  This book is available:

  for free at: https://catholiccandle.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/Lumen-Gentium-Annotated.pdf


and

  sold at cost on Amazon.com at this link: https://www.amazon.com/Lumen-Gentium-Annotated-examination-revolution/dp/1492107476/ref=sr_1_1